What’s for Dinner? By Kelly Williamson

August 18th, 2015 - Posted by zoot
What's for Dinner? By Kelly Williamson
One of the most common questions I get when talking to fellow athletes is that of my diet. People always want to know what I eat when racing (fairly simple, a lot of gels), but also what our diet looks like regularly. Do we eat gluten free or vegan? Do I eat 6,000 calories a day? What do I eliminate, especially going into races? How strictly do we eat?

 

I always enjoy this topic because, while my husband Derick and I eat very healthy, we also eat balanced and we make it a goal to enjoy what we consume. To answer the above: No, we do not eat gluten-free. I’ve never tried eating vegan, but never had much of an interest. I did ‘think’ I was gluten-intolerant about 9 years ago when I was having some stomach issues. I eliminated my evening beer for a few days, then I came home one night with a 6-pk of beer in hand. Derick asked me what I was doing with it. My response was, “Yeah, I don’t think it’s the gluten.” (Some self-control, right? Turned out, I had gallstones and later had my gall bladder removed! Poof..stomach issues resolved!) I have no idea how many calories a day I eat; I don’t count them. I don’t eliminate anything, regularly or as I head into big races. I figure there are enough other stressors; no need to deprive myself of the things I enjoy (such as coffee, chocolate, ice cream and good beer); especially if I know they directly are not going to negatively impact performance. I would not say we are strict with our diet; but we eat ‘consciously’. I try to focus on assuring that I get enough calories, protein and good quality foods, especially after workouts; but at the same time I listen to my body and eat more when hungry and a bit less when I feel full. I’m a huge fan of fresh lemon in water, which I can sip on most of the day. One weakness I have is that I am a meal eater. I grew up in a family that ate 3 meals a day. I like to be hungry for meals, and enjoy them. I often don’t need a lot of snacks because often times, I’m wrapping up a workout right before a meal; so in lieu of a ‘recovery smoothie’, I often just go straight for a full meal. Derick and I often realize we probably eat healthier than we think, because any time we travel, we find we come home craving our usual staples; good coffee in the morning, a solid breakfast, avocado/veggie/turkey sandwiches for lunch, dark greens, salmon…and of course our favorite indulgences to stay balanced.
What's for Dinner? By Kelly Williamson
 
On this note, I wanted to share with y’all one of our favorite go-to dinners. Almost every night we have a massive salad, which includes some mixture of the following:
Dark greens (spinach, kale, and/or swiss chard) – Berries (often blueberries and raspberries) and/or Apple – Red onion – Nuts (pecans, almonds, walnuts or sunflower seeds) – Quality cheese (fresh soft mozzarella or goat cheese) – topped with a vinegar based dressing and a creamier dressing (my favorites are Briannas Blush Wine Vinaigrette and Delmonico’s Ranch). I’ll always add beets if we have them cooked up. I love lots of color and variety among veggies, fruits, nuts and cheese. 

 

Derick has affectionately termed these “Kelly Salads” and he would like to see me start selling them. I just see them as dinner! This is always ‘part’ of our meal, rarely the entire meal. We often make ‘quinoa bowls’, which include:
Quinoa (cooked in chicken broth to add flavor) – Chopped bell peppers – Garlic and onion – Chicken sausage (often a flavored kind, Aidells makes some great ones especially spinach and feta or habanero and green chili; Open Nature is very good as well) – topped with a bit of shredded cheese. And you can easily get creative with these; toss in tomatoes, black beans, avocado, or whatever else you prefer. 

 

Of course, no lunch or dinner is complete to me without something sweet. After lunch it may be some sea salt dark chocolate (Lindt makes a great one and pretty inexpensive) or a chocolate chip cookie, and after dinner most nights I have a small bowl of ice cream. Actually, who am I kidding; every night I eat ice cream. My favorite is cookies and cream with some peanut butter mixed in.

 

When I begin to prepare dinner, I love to open a good beer, relax, and slowly start the preparation process; often after taking our pup for his evening play, it means the day is done, and whether it was good or bad; it’s time to put it behind you and settle in to the evening. While we often prepare simple meals, I find that after all the workouts and the ‘going’ all day long, the process of dinner prep is one of the most relaxing times of the day when Derick and I can turn on some good music, catch up and often talk about things non-triathlon related. When your husband is also your coach, this is something we both often crave! 

-Kelly Williamson
kellyhwilliamson.com
@khwilliamson

Training (or Chilling) with Music: What Moves You? By: Kelly Williamson

May 21st, 2015 - Posted by zoot
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Music has the power to inspire. While people and events clearly serve as inspiration, something as simple as songs inspire me daily. Music works as a conversation starter; it gives you deeper insight into who people are; it can even spark a bond between two people. I’ll never forget when I met my husband Derick. I was 24 at the time, likely ruminating about some triathlon related event in my life which I am sure was “massive” at the time but in the big scheme, a small bump in the road. (He was working for a coaching company at the time). I said to him over one of our earlier conversations, “You have to laugh at yourself, because you’d cry your eyes out if you didn’t.” This dude was good. Without missing a beat, he replies, “You’re an Indigo Girls fan, huh.” Well, he sure knew how to win a girl over… a GUY who knew this line from a song? Spark. Bam. Done. Here we are, some 13 years later!

 

Every evening when Derick and I make dinner, we turn on a Pandora station and catch up on our day with some good tunes in the background. Some of the frequent Pandora stations you’ll find in the Williamson household include the likes of Robert Earl Keen, John Fullbright, Jason Isbell, Ray Wylie Hubbard; Brandi Carlile, the Highwaymen radio. Clearly, pretty mellow stuff for the evenings. The wonderful thing about music that you can always find something to suit your mood; and on that same note, music also has the ability to change your mood. I can find myself enjoying a beer, making dinner, my mind running through events from the day, stressing out; then I find myself singing along with a song and it seems worries can melt away. It can allow us to shift our focus often to a more relaxed state without even consciously realizing it.  

 

Seeing that I love music and a good many hours of my days are spent training solo, it gives me massive time to spend with my good friend, Kelly’s Ipod. While I love good company for a long bike ride, I also get excited as I prep for a 5-6 hour solo ride, getting the bike ready, the nutrition set up, rolling out the door, and putting my music in my ear (right ear only of course). While I can appreciate solitude and silence, it makes some of that alone time a bit more pleasant when I can cruise through the Texas hill country being serenaded by some of my favorites. Likewise, when I have to crank out a tough set on the bike or on the trails, I turn it over to those who can get me in the mood to shut off the pain and dig as deep as possible. It seems there’s always a song for the occasion, be it a mellow 5 hours or a hard as hell 6 minutes. There is something about focusing on song lyrics and averting your attention directly from your effort that can allow you dig a bit deeper and enjoy the experience a little more.

 

On that note, I wanted to share some of my top song choices; broken down into two categories. Long endurance workout favorites, and hard session choices. Of course these lists are frequently changing, but some are tried and true staples. Maybe you can find a new song or two in here. But ultimately, find what moves your mood and go with it!

 

Long Mellow Sessions
I Like Birds (Eels)
Follow Your Arrow (Kacey Musgraves)
Whim of Iron (Slaid Cleaves)
Happy (John Fullbright)
People are Crazy (Billy Currington)
Old Before Your Time (Ray LaMontagne)
Gone Again (Indigo Girls)
My Hometown (Charlie Robison)
Enjoy Yourself (Todd Snider)

 

Hard Sessions
Back in Black (AC/DC)
GDFR (Flo Rida)
No Church in the Wild (JAY Z & Kanye West)
Glory & Consequence (Ben Harper)
In the End (Linkin Park)
We Can’t Stop (Miley Cyrus)
Dani California (Red Hot Chili Peppers)
Ni**as in Paris (JAY Z & Kanye West)
Lonely Boy (The Black Keys)
Mainstream Kid (Brandi Carlile)
Dark Horse (Katy Perry)

 

-Kelly Williamson
@khwilliamson

5 Training Tips to Spring into Shape!

May 11th, 2015 - Posted by zoot

It’s time to spring into shape and begin a fresh training schedule with new ideas to get you stronger and ready to race.

Add a little spring into your step with these 5 training tips:

1)   Set Goals

Set one big goal for the spring season training, something to look forward to. It could be training for your first 5k, racing a half or full marathon you have always wanted to do, or reaching a personal best by the end of the season. Keep it simple and stick to what inspires you! Write it down and gain confidence in that goal.

Set mini milestone goals to motivate you to achieve that one big goal you set for your spring season. Milestone goals can be as simple as eat more greens, get 8 hours of sleep a night, take a few minutes out of the day to stretch & strengthen or finish a run a little faster than normal. It is important to be consistent with your goals and reward yourself!

2)   Track Your Progress 

Write down your weekly training in a training journal. Map it out and watch the progression. Write down weekly miles, hours of sleep, and how you felt in each workout. This allows organization to your training and a method to track what works and doesn’t work. It is also nice to backtrack and see what you did days, months, even years ago.

 3)  Mix Things Up

Workouts- A variety in your training can strengthen different muscles in the body and create an overall balance.

Hill Repeats- Is there one hill near your home that you despise walking, biking, or running up? Well, here is a great workout for you. One day a week confidently focus on that hill. Start slow doing 3 reps up/and recovery downhill. Eventually, you can increase the hill reps, allowing your muscle fibers to adjust to the alternative terrain. Hill repeats will increase your heart rate, strengthen and tone your glutes, and most importantly your mind and body will naturally adapt to the hills, allowing confidence to overcome every step of the climb.

Intervals- Interval training is a great way to mix up your workouts. Instead of going by distance, go by time. Set your workout to segmented intervals. For example, you can run 1 minute fast, with 1 minute recovery, 2 minutes fast, 2 minutes recovery, 3 minutes fast, 3 minutes recovery, etc. Intervals are a great way to see what pace is right for you. You can decrease the recovery time to see how well you adapt to recovering. Intervals are a great way to get you fit and in that racing mode!

Tempo- Tempo is also known as a lactate threshold run and is a faster paced workout to help you gain endurance. It should be at a faster pace than your normal run pace and a little slower than your race pace. It should be a pace that you can keep for a longer run and should feel comfortably hard. The more training, the higher you can push your threshold. So how do you find your threshold? You can start by adding 30-40 seconds to your average 5k-10k pace. If you average 8:00 per mile in the 5k your threshold pace will be relative to 8:30-8:40 per mile. It should be a hard yet comfortable pace you can do for 15-20 minutes continuously.

Location– Mix it up with the location of your runs. If you run the same route daily it could easily lead to burn out. Try to run on grass or trail for longer runs to reduce the impact, and recover faster.

Find a running friend– A friend running next to you can help keep the pace of the run honest and consistent. A friend to run with is a perfect way to motivate you and create a positive attitude. It is nothing like a good conversation to make a long run go by when you have a friend to talk to and reach out to. A running friend can also critique your form and help improve your stride.

4)   Strength- there is more to it than just running! 

Body mechanics – Work on the little things to strengthen for an overall balanced body. Each day focus on a part of the body to make it stronger!  

YogaStrength is not only important physically but mentally as well. Take a few minutes out of your day to stretch quietly and clear the mind through meditation. It not only relaxes you but freshens the body for your next run!

CoreThe core is the foundation to running. With a strong core your body can move mechanically, creating less tension in the hips, glutes, and legs. Even if it is 5-10 minutes of core while watching television, your abs can still get a nice workout.

5)   Race More, Race Faster       

April racing brings May personal bests! Do you get the nervous jitters at the starting line? Well, the common cure is to race. The more you race the more confident you become and your body gets accustomed to the adrenaline. Believe in your training and know that you are ready for any race!

 

Choosing the Shoe for You

March 5th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

Finding the right running shoe can be a difficult task. (Of course, we think that once you have decided to buy a Zoot running shoe half the battle is done. – Ed.) With so many options out there it can feel overwhelming. Even once you pick a brand, the shoe selection can still be difficult with each shoe company offering a myriad of choices in their respective line-ups. Yet there is a reason for this overwhelming amount of choices. Zoot offers ten different shoes that cover everything from racing to training and provide different types of support for every running style. Our shoe finder can be found here: Zoot Shoe Finder.

However, picking a shoe doesn’t have to be hard. Follow our shoe selection guide and you will be out the door and running in no time.

The first step when buying a new shoe is to figure out what type of foot you have. Next you need to decide how you will be using the shoe. Do you want a racer, trainer or something in-between? When making this decision it is important to know that the more race orientated the shoe, the less support and cushioning it will have.  This is done to keep the shoe lightweight for race day.

Once you have these two things figured out it’s time to head over to our shoe finder  at zootsports.com. It will walk you through our men’s and women’s shoe lines and help you pick the right shoe for your needs.

Finally, share with us! We always like hearing from the Zoot Tribe about their experiences with our gear.

Happy running!

Ben Hoffman Shares His Training Essentials

February 20th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

Today we have a guest blog from Zoot Pro triathlete, Ben Hoffman. In 2013, Ben won Ironman Coeur d’Alene and set the course record with a time of 8:17:31 – now that’s fast! He followed that race up with a win at Branson Rev3 and a 15th place finish at the Ironman World Championships. Today, Ben shares what gets him through those other 360 days a year – his training days.

Zoot Training Essentials

Although Zoot may be known best for their race day equipment, I am outfitted in their training gear head to toe virtually every day in preparation for my events (Like we say, “Train as you race!” – Ed.). The hundreds of hours that go into preparing for an Ironman require equipment that is durable, comfortable and provides an extremely high level of performance for each of the three disciplines. An average training week, while building into a full-distance race, includes roughly 35 hours of training. Broken down that is approximately 18 hours on the bike, 8 to 9 hours running, 6 hours in the pool and 2 hours of strength training. Here is a rundown of some of the gear I use for my preparation.

On My Feet

Running is one of man’s most primal forms of exercise, but it’s not all about going barefoot and naked. My go-to training shorts, when the weather is nice, are the Ultra Run Icefil 8”. Not only does the spandex Icefil liner ventilate well, but it also provides a little extra support on long runs and completely eliminates chaffing. I seriously can’t believe how long I put up with the irritation that other liners create – these are a true epiphany. Finally, the Ultra short has side pockets, and for days when I need a little company in the form of music, I can slide the iPhone or iPod in the pocket for bounce-free carrying. They serve well for car keys or gels. too.

The most comfortable and versatile shoes I have worn for training purposes are the Ultra TT Trainer WR. They have additional cushioning, are still relatively lightweight, and are the perfect compliment to my Ironman race shoe, the Ultra TT 7.0,

For up top, I’m a fan of the Ultra Run Icefil Mesh Tee in warmer weather, and the Performance Run Microlite ½ zip when temps get colder. And when it’s really cold I wear the Ultra Run Biowrap Thermo Tights to keep my legs warm.

Finally, for race day, it’s all about the Zoot custom one-piece kit, visor and Ultra TT 7.0 shoe. I switch out the Ultra TT 7.0 for the Ultra Kiawe 2.0 for half-ironman races.

In the Saddle

My longest hours come in the saddle, and here it’s all about the custom Ultra Cycle bibs and jersey. When it gets cold, I throw on the thermo top, thermo leg warmers and Megaheat jacket.  Fortunately, there is ample pocket space for food, phone, etc., and the fabric wicks moisture like a sponge.

For racing, I rely on my custom Zoot kit for superior comfort and aerodynamic fit.

In the Water

It’s been a long haul learning how to swim with the front pack, but I couldn’t have done it without countless hours in the Ultra swim brief, chasing the black line and playing wall tag. When it comes time to hit the open water, I can be found in my Prophet 2.0 Wetzoot, or the Speedzoot for warmer days. The Prophet provides unmatched range of motion, incredible buoyancy, and is easy to peel off for quick transitions. Finally, it’s Zoot’s Swimfit cap that covers my dome.

The Rest of the Time

Not every hour of every day is spent training, but triathlon is definitely a lifestyle, and I have some other pieces of gear that fill in the gaps between workouts. Recovery is priority number one when I’ve finished my harder sessions, so I love to toss on the Recovery 2.0 CRx sock after long runs and rides, or during long travel days. As the Californians have taught us, a hoodie is one of the most versatile pieces of clothing made, and fortunately Zoot’s looks great, too. One last staple in my Zoot arsenal are the Recovery Slides, which are on my feet before and after every swim.

So there you have it! Zoot has me covered head to toe for my longest training days and the time between. No matter whether you live in a cold or warm climate, Zoot has your back with their comprehensive lineup of comfortable and high performance products.

#LoveYourRun Recipe: Chickpea and Cherry Frittata

February 18th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

One of our favorite things about Sunday morning workouts is the breakfast waiting for us on our return. With abundant carbs, protein and antioxidants, this amazing frittata recipe from Runner’s World is the perfect recovery meal.

Via Runner’s World (http://www.runnersworld.com/recipes/recipe-chickpea-and-cherry-frittata)

Ingredients
8 eggs, lightly whisked
1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1 cup chopped fresh cherries or 1/2 cup chopped dried cherries
4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
1/4 cup unsweetened almond milk
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
2 tablespoons agave nectar or honey
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 cup loosely packed, torn fresh mint leaves for garnish

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a bowl, mix the eggs, chickpeas, cherries, goat cheese, almond milk, thyme, agave nectar and cream of tartar. In a medium ovenproof skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet and cook for 2 minutes without stirring. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake till the eggs are puffed and set in the middle, about 20 minutes. Let the frittata cool for 5 to 10 minutes. With a rubber spatula, gently work the frittata out of the pan and transfer it to a cutting board. Cut the frittata into wedges and serve garnished with the mint. Serves four to six.

Nutrition Information

Calories Per Serving: 395
Carbs: 25 g
Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 22 g
Fat: 22 g

Introduction to Building your Training Base

February 12th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

It is hard to believe that we are already two weeks into February 2014. As we plan our training and races for the year we can’t forget to look at the fundamentals, especially building our preseason base.

Aptly titled, the goal of the base phase portion of a training plan is to create a strong foundation for us to build our harder workouts and races efforts off of. Why is this so important? Not only does a proper base phase help minimize the potential for injury, more importantly it builds the muscular, cardiovascular and bio-chemical processes that our bodies need to reach our full potential.

The principle component of a proper foundation is the LSD (Long Slow Day). The goal is to get out and put the miles in while keeping our efforts aerobic. Think conversational pace. In fact, this is the perfect time to do group runs and catch up with friends. If you can’t carry a conversation, you are going too fast!

As our foundation becomes stronger we can start throwing in limited efforts, such as a fartlek once a week, to spice things up and prepare the body for the higher intensity work down the road. However, these types of workouts should be saved for the latter portion of the base phase. For example, if we have planned our base phase to last a month (the minimum time period required to build a proper base) the first three weeks would be made entirely of LSDs, with the third week having a workout with an effort.

The secondary component of preseason training is to hit the weight room and work on muscular deficiencies that we might have, specifically our core and upper body strength. This is the perfect time to do this because as the season develops, and our training becomes sport specific, we won’t have the time to work on focused strength training. Again, here it is important to add weight slowly. The goal is not to build explosive power, but consistent strength.

These are just the basic fundamentals for developing your preseason base training. For additional information on how to plan your training cycle we recommend contacting a USA Triathlon Certified Coach.

Our Key Warm Up Tips

February 5th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

Like any machine, the human body needs to be warmed up before we use it. Not doing so increases our chance of injury while also limiting our potential out of the starting gate. It is hard to #LoveYourRun if our bodies are seizing up on us.

We all understand the idea of getting our blood flowing and loosening our muscles, but a proper warm-up also activates the bodies various systems so that we can perform at our best level. Here are our three favorite tips to get us ready for that big workout or race.

Static is Out, Dynamic is In
Traditionally stretching was static. It was based on the idea of holding various poses for 30 seconds to a minute to make us limber. However, while studies have shown that this is still useful to help you relax and calm the nervous system, it does not help us train.

Instead, prior to exercising we should be stretching dynamically. This has the benefit of improving power, strength and performance. When we dynamically stretch we move our muscles through their full range of motion in a repeated and smooth fashion. The goal is to activate the muscles that we’ll be using during the workout. It is important that we don’t overextend our muscles or be forceful, because this will lead to injuries.

Start Slowly
Because we all have limited time to get our training blocks in, we can be easily tempted to skip the warm up and jump right into the workout. We have to ignore that impulse and slowly ramp up our exercise. Our bodies need time to become aware of what we are about to ask of them. This is especially important if we are tired or sore. By not giving the body enough time to wake up, we are only asking for injury.

Listen to Your Body
We ask a lot from our bodies. We train continuously so that we can compete in three distinct sports. In return, it is important that we listen to what our bodies have to say. There will be days that a minimal warm up is all we need before we hit the trail. On other days, we might have to run several miles on the track before our bodies start to respond. By listening to this feedback we can keep our bodies healthy and strong and needlessly miss training days through easily avoidable injuries.

Energy Bar Alternative – Dr. Allen Lim’s Rice Cakes

January 28th, 2014 - Posted by zoot

We love our bars, gels and sport drinks here at Zoot, but sometimes on our longer training rides it’s nice to change things up. A favorite of ours is Dr. Allen Lim’s rice cakes. Not only do they have a great sweet and tangy taste, sometimes it’s just nice to eat real food when riding.

Here is a great video of Dr. Lim and Biju Thomas making them: http://youtu.be/QMgquxRH7dQ For more great recipes visit their site: http://feedzonecookbook.com

Now we want to know, what home recipes do you guys use as alternatives to bars, gels and sport drinks?

Rice Cakes

2 cups uncooked calrose or other medium-grain “sticky” rice

3 cups water

8 ounces bacon

4 eggs

2 tablespoons liquid amino acids or low-sodium soy sauce

brown sugar

salt and grated parmesan (optional)

Combine rice and water in a rice cooker.

While rice is cooking, chop up bacon before frying, and then fry in a medium sauté pan. When crispy, drain off fat and soak up excess fat with paper towels.

Beat the eggs in a small bowl and then scramble on high heat in the sauté pan. Don’t worry about overcooking the eggs as they’ll break up easily when mixed with the rice.

In a large bowl or in the rice cooker bowl, combine the cooked rice, bacon, and scrambled eggs. Add liquid amino acids or soy sauce and sugar to taste. After mixing, press into an 8- or 9-inch square baking pan to about 1½-inch thickness. Top with more brown sugar, salt to taste, and grated parmesan, if desired.

Tip: They always use calrose rice, a strain of medium-grain rice common in Asian cooking. This variety cooks fast (in 20 minutes or less), retains a nutty flavor, and is just sticky enough to hold our cakes together. If you can’t find it, use another medium-grain rice or any kind marked “sushi rice.”

Nutrition data per serving:

1 cake:
Energy 225 cal • Fat 8 g • Sodium 321 mg • Carbs 30 g • Fiber 1 g • Protein 9 g




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